onaissues
onaissues:

“Twitter Inc. has acknowledged that after mobile users tap the “Find friends” feature on its smartphone app, the company downloads users’ entire address book, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months.
The company also said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being transmitted and stored. The company’s current privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that Twitter downloads and stores user address books.”
Read more on the LA Times: Twitter stores full iPhone contact list for 18 months, after scan.

onaissues:

“Twitter Inc. has acknowledged that after mobile users tap the “Find friends” feature on its smartphone app, the company downloads users’ entire address book, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months.

The company also said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being transmitted and stored. The company’s current privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that Twitter downloads and stores user address books.”

Read more on the LA Times: Twitter stores full iPhone contact list for 18 months, after scan.

ericmortensen
ericmortensen:

ohryankelley:

Take This Lollipop will make you think twice about what you share on Facebook
Take This Lollipop is a interesting use of the Facebook API – one that  plays on a lot of people’s fears about privacy when it comes to social  media.
Click through to Take This Lillipop.

Whoa! This is brilliant. It’s either a powerful warning against using Facebook or the future of horror movies. Or both.

ericmortensen:

ohryankelley:

Take This Lollipop will make you think twice about what you share on Facebook

Take This Lollipop is a interesting use of the Facebook API – one that plays on a lot of people’s fears about privacy when it comes to social media.

Click through to Take This Lillipop.

Whoa! This is brilliant. It’s either a powerful warning against using Facebook or the future of horror movies. Or both.

My problem with diaspora*

diaspora

I’m glad someone is taking initiative here, but I think we’re all getting a little ahead of ourselves.

The groups on Facebook are plentiful.  People seemingly can’t wait to get off Facebook and to join this new - promised to be more secure - social network. Why?

Seemingly, this is just a whole lot of backlash from the recent security fallout from Facebook.  We’re yet to even see a hint of a working model or mock up, and they’ve already raised over $180,000.  They’ve already been written up in the New York Times and pretty much everywhere else on the Internet.

I’m happy they’re around, but I’m not yet ready to jump ship.

Facebook works because it’s a hub. Social media only work when you can interact with the people you know (or at least the people you claim to know). If only a few of my friends join diaspora, what’s the point? Right now - for most of you with a Facebook account - nearly all of your friends are also on the FBook.  So is your mom, dad, cousin, teacher, aunt, grandma, friend and nerdy kid down the street. It’s both good and bad, but that’s the key: the people are there.

I, too, have high hopes for diaspora.  Frankly, there is every chance in the world that it becomes a Facebook killer - a more secure Facebook killer, though that is a very, very large task to take on.  If it can carve out just a tiny bit of the users, it will work, and maybe even give even more of a wakeup call to Facebook to clean up it’s act.

But for now, I’m reserved.  I’ll be following along with their progress this summer, but until I start seeing how and why things will work with diaspora, I have little to go on and therefore little hope for it’s chances.

soupsoup

soupsoup:

Facing increasing pressure from the media and users, Facebook has called an all hands meeting tomorrow afternoon, at 4 PM Pacific, to discuss the company’s overall privacy strategy according to sources inside the company.

They must hear the drums beating. I’ve never seen such immediate and outspoken backlash like we’ve seen with this.